Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Gay Fascism in a High School Economics Class

From the Livingston Daily:
Howell Public Schools Superintendent Ron Wilson on Thursday said high school teacher Jay McDowell was disciplined after it was determined McDowell violated a student’s First Amendment rights and significantly violated a district policy.

“The student was speaking out on being offended by the gay and lesbian lifestyle because it’s against his religion. The teacher said that wasn’t appropriate,” Wilson said.

The student, 16-year-old junior Daniel Glowacki, was then ejected from McDowell’s economics class, Wilson said, along with another student after Glowacki and McDowell argued about another student wearing a belt buckle featuring the Confederate Flag.
Glowacki was asking the teacher why, if the Confederate Flag was considered offensive, he didn’t have an equal right to feel offended at the rainbow shirts gay, lesbian and liberal students were wearing, since his Catholic beliefs hold that homosexuality is sinful.
Glowacki was given a referral for his role in the ordeal. A referral is given to a student for breaking a school rule. The referral, given for minor offenses, goes on the student’s permanent record. Glowacki was given a referral, written up by McDowell, but not suspended from school.

Daniel Glowacki’s mother, Sandy Glowacki, told the Daily Press & Argus on Thursday that Howell High School Principal Aaron Moran delivered a letter to her home saying the referral had been taken off his record because Daniel Glowacki committed no wrongdoing.

The Daily Press & Argus on Tuesday filed a Freedom Of Information Act request seeking documentation from the district investigation. Assistant Superintendent Lynn Parrish on Thursday said the district served notice of the request to McDowell, alerting him the information may be released. McDowell has the option to request the information be held for an extended period of time.

“(McDowell) has options and he has the right to exercise each and every remedy he may have,” Parrish said.

McDowell did not return calls Thursday from the Daily Press & Argus seeking comment. He has declined comment when asked about the issue throughout the week.

The district Oct. 20 was taking part in a national “Spirit Day” — a Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation event aimed to raise awareness of anti-gay bullying after the recent suicides of six gay teens across the United States who had been harassed. Students in support of the day wore purple T-shirts that read “Tyler’s Army,” for one of the six who died. Others wore shirts featuring a rainbow, which signifies gay pride.

Daniel Glowacki, who has since been removed from the class and placed in another class at the request of his mother, questioned why it was allowed for students to show their support for the gay community and not allowed for a student to wear her Confederate flag belt buckle.

“I don’t really care what people think, but I don’t want people to think I’m against gays. That’s just not true,” Daniel Glowacki said.

A complaint was filed against McDowell, head of the Howell Education Association teachers’ union, by a parent. Sandy Glowacki said she did not file the complaint. That complaint led to an investigation, which led to McDowell being suspended one day without pay. District officials considered the issue over until it was found out McDowell posted information about his suspension on Facebook. He has since returned to work.

“The day the incident took place, I received several e-mails from parents saying they believe students were being harassed for not wearing the T-shirts,” Wilson said Thursday. “We have a clear, established anti-bullying policy. [emphasis added]
Translation: students who declined to show support for the gay and lesbian cause were victims of bullying.
“All the student was doing was voicing an opinion. The same thing would have been done had the student been on the other side. As superintendent, it’s my responsibility to foster fair, respectful treatment of all staff and students, and the teacher didn’t do that.”

Sandy Glowacki said she wanted her son and McDowell to apologize to each other, but because of comments being made about her son, she may seek legal action, although she acknowledged no one has mentioned her son by name.

Wilson said he is hopeful no legal action comes from the occurrence.

“My son is not a bigot,” Sandy Glowacki said. “He has a very diverse group of friends that includes some gays. If a gay student was being picked on in class, he’d stick up for them.

“But I feel his freedom of expression and freedom of speech have been violated along with his character.”
There is more coverage here and here.

Apparently the teacher verbally assaulted the dissenting students, calling them “racists.”

Daniel Glowacki learned some lessons about political correctness. Politically correct people are allowed to shut down any views they dislike by claiming to be offended, but politically incorrect people are required to tolerate anything thrown at them.

McDowell should not have merely received the one-day suspension, he should have been fired. One qualification to be a teacher is to deal tolerantly with disagreement from students, even when the student is expressing an idea you dislike. Not being a bigot, in other words, should be a qualification to be a teacher. And “bigotry” here is not defined as leftists define it — holding politically incorrect opinions. Bigotry is getting bent out of shape in the face of politically incorrect opinions.

We were about to ask rhetorically “how long before something like this happens at Marquette?” But almost certainly things like this have happened here. We have learned about some, but been unable to blog about them because we could not source them properly.

In one case a student of ours told us about hair-raising things that happened to his roommate. We urged him to urge his roommate to talk to us, but the roommate never did. A lot of students, feeling intimidated and emotionally bruised, want to let the issue drop.

Glowacki is a hero for, at least briefly, sticking to his guns and challenging what the teacher said. That’s a dangerous thing to do in high schools, and in colleges, when the teacher is a politically correct liberal or leftist.

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4 Comments:

Anonymous Chris said...

Based on what I read, I would agree that Glowacki's First Amendment rights were violated.

But anyone who would seriously compare the Confederate Flag (which is inextricably linked with your country's ugly history of slavery) and rainbow shirts (which simply convey one's sexual orientation or support for gay rights) is a weapons-grade idiot.

I have trouble believing Glowacki's mother's claim that her son has gay friends. Why would any self-respecting gay person hang around with someone who would make such a moronic comparison?

Since Glowacki is offended by anything with a rainbow on it, presumably he'd object to this, as well.

4:23 PM  
Blogger John McAdams said...

Confederate Flag (which is inextricably linked with your country's ugly history of slavery)

That's what politically correct people now say.

The flag was used in the intro to "Dukes of Hazard." It is on the cover of one album from the country group Alabama.

Go to the Rock and Roll Museum and you'll see Ronny Van Zant singing in front if it.

It's traditionally been merely a symbol of Southern pride.

On the other hand, the gay rainbow flag is associated with numerous acts of fascist intolerance -- with this being one.

At some point, you can't be a libertarian unless you reject the assessments of politically correct people.

4:36 PM  
Anonymous Chris said...

Let me get this straight, the Confederate Battle Flag is merely a wholesome (as apple pie?) symbol of Southern pride, but the gay rainbow is a symbol of fascism?!

Seriously?!

Good grief, John. That has to be one of the most bizarre statements you've ever made. If Ed Brayton happens to be lurking, he's got his next blog topic. ;-)

I notice you tend to use the term "politically correct" essentially the same way that liberals use the term "racist" or "bigot" (i.e. as a debate stopper).

You actually think that if you refer to someone as "politically correct" it's a slam dunk and the debate is over. Sorry, but that doesn't work with me.

And if I were to take all your advice on how to be a proper "libertarian" I would no longer be a libertarian. I'd be a conservative just like you, and I much prefer being a libertarian.

BTW, Cato's David Boaz wrote this piece on the Confederate Battle Flag back in 2001:

http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=4320

I guess he's not a "real libertarian" either, right?

7:42 PM  
Blogger John McAdams said...

Let me get this straight, the Confederate Battle Flag is merely a wholesome (as apple pie?) symbol of Southern pride, but the gay rainbow is a symbol of fascism?!

No, both are controversial.

But you think one controversial symbol has protected status, and the other doesn't.

BTW, Cato's David Boaz wrote this piece on the Confederate Battle Flag back in 2001:

You seem to have overlooked this part:

The political philosopher Jacob T. Levy of the University of Chicago points out that official state symbols are very different from privately displayed symbols. The First Amendment protects the right of individuals to display Confederate battle flags, Che Guevara posters and vulgar bumper stickers.

And if I were to take all your advice on how to be a proper "libertarian" I would no longer be a libertarian. I'd be a conservative just like you, and I much prefer being a libertarian.

You aren't a libertarian, Chris, you are a politically correct liberal or leftist.

10:32 PM  

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